DARE TO BE HUMAN

02

Colin Kaepernick became the hero for social cause in Nike’s 'Dream Crazy' ad by Wieden+Kennedy, launched to celebrate the brand’s 30th Anniversary of Just Do It. 'Dream Crazy' took a Grand Prix in the inaugural Entertainment Lions for Sport for the spot in which Kaepernick, derailed in America for taking a knee during NFL games to protest police brutality, encouraged viewers to believe in something, and stand up for it.

'Nike took a risk in using Colin Kaepernick and sticking with him,' said Steve Stoute, Founder & CEO, Translation Enterprises. 'The use of Kaepernick was so special that it’s the benchmark that creative should take going forward.'  The risk was real. But so was the reward. Nike’s sales initially dipped but picked up, and pushed its sales up 31% vs. 17% for the same three-day period the year prior.

For Nike, big risk and big reward from the Kaepernick campaign. 

Nike took a risk in using Colin Kaepernick and sticking with him

Steve Stoute
Founder & CEO, Translation Enterprises

By aligning with partners who represent core brand values, companies were able to drop themselves smack into cultural conversations, making their brands and products more relevant and relatable to customers and driving a trove of Grand Prix and Gold wins in the process.

THE LEAD

Advertisers put a human face on campaigns that leveraged cultural flashpoints to form an emotional connection with consumers.

Sonic branding can tell an entire brand story in less than a second.

Visa and Mastercard both leveraged sound to make that connection with consumers. To reflect the trust and security of the brand, Visa created a tone at point of purchase: They began with over 200 sounds, narrowed it to 20, and focus tested. ‘As a global brand, you need to be mindful. What’s energetic for me isn’t for others,’ says Lynne Biggar, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, Visa.

Mastercard created a comprehensive program that spans multiple musical genres across dozens of countries to localise the Mastercard melody that can be heard in physical spaces, digital places and voice. Raja Rajamannar, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, said voice is becoming a competitive advantage since consumers see 5,000 marketing images daily. 

Sonic branding was increasingly explored as a way to connect with consumers deeply on a multisensory level — especially by financial service brands, not typically associated with touchy, feely relationships with their customers. 

The company 'made a decision to adopt a new philosophy to put people at the center of all we do,' said Marcel Marcondes, Chief Marketing Officer, Anheuser-Busch, replacing its product-as-hero formula. Recent work paid homage to legendary baseball player Jackie Robinson, the first black player in Major League Baseball, and basketball great, Dwyane Wade.

The Festival didn’t just show how marketers added more humanity, they told. Speakers lit up the stage with the notion to put more humanity in their marketing.

Anheuser-Busch put Jackie Robinson at the center of messaging. 

The Grand Prix tackled this issue in a bold, impactful way and changed the message.

Yasuharu Sasaki
Jury President, Creative Data and Head of Digital Creative, Executive Creative Director, Dentsu

The agency flipped the message and took a Grand Prix in Creative Data in doing so. For the 'Go Back To Africa' campaign, promoting its 54 countries as destinations, they built a database of travel imagery showing more people of colour, currently represented in less than 6% of all travel imagery, to promote travel for high-end travel group, Black & Abroad.

The words 'Go back to Africa' appear every three minutes on social media. FCB/SIX found that 70% of their target audience had been the recipient of the term while another 12% said they encountered it more than 50 times. 

FCB/SIX flipped the messaging with the Go Back to Africa campaign.

Assailed by the President of the U.S. as being treasonous and spreading fake news, The New York Times defended its credibility and the free press by showcasing the newspaper’s gritty and life-risking reporting skills through the lens of an actual reporter. 'The Truth is Worth It' picked up a Grand Prix in Film Craft and other Lions.

The New York Times defends its integrity with The Truth is Worth It.

Unpolished creative can work as hard, if not harder, than slick ads according to Tim Leake, SVP/Chief Marketing and Innovation Officer, RPA.

Authenticity resonates with consumers and besides, less polished is faster, easier and cheaper. 'People have an aversion to ads that look like ads,' said Tim Leake, Senior Vice President and Innovation Officer, RPA. In the talk 'Ugly Sells' Leake encouraged marketers and advertisers to focus less on production value and art direction to be more real and relatable, an important brand criteria for Generation Z.

Leake cited work with social media platform TikTok that embraces the new standard. 'If you do this artificial polished stuff it just gets between yourself and the consumer. Nobody in the real world would talk like commercials talk like,' said Stefan Heinrich Henriquez, Global Head of Marketing, TikTok.

Slick is out – perfectly, imperfect is in.

Right now, what we're finding is that less polished content is outperforming the more highly produced cut-downs that we do in our regular advertising.


Toto Haba

Senior Vice President Global Digital, Benefit Cosmetics

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited

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©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited

02

DARE TO BE HUMAN

Colin Kaepernick became the hero for social cause in Nike’s 'Dream Crazy' ad by Wieden+Kennedy, launched to celebrate the brand’s 30th Anniversary of Just Do It. 'Dream Crazy' took a Grand Prix in the inaugural Entertainment Lions for Sport for the spot in which Kaepernick, derailed in America for taking a knee during NFL games to protest police brutality, encouraged viewers to believe in something, and stand up for it.

'Nike took a risk in using Colin Kaepernick and sticking with him,' said Steve Stoute, Founder & CEO, Translation Enterprises. 'The use of Kaepernick was so special that it’s the benchmark that creative should take going forward.'  The risk was real. But so was the reward. Nike’s sales initially dipped but picked up, and pushed its sales up 31% vs. 17% for the same three-day period the year prior.

For Nike, big risk and big reward from the Kaepernick campaign. 

Nike took a risk in using Colin Kaepernick and sticking with him

Steve Stoute
Founder & CEO, Translation Enterprises

By aligning with partners who represent core brand values, companies were able to drop themselves smack into cultural conversations, making their brands and products more relevant and relatable to customers and driving a trove of Grand Prix and Gold wins in the process.

THE LEAD

Advertisers put a human face on campaigns that leveraged cultural flashpoints to form an emotional connection with consumers.

The Grand Prix tackled this issue in a bold, impactful way and changed the message.

Yasuharu Sasaki
Jury President, Creative Data and Head of Digital Creative, Executive Creative Director, Dentsu

Assailed by the President of the U.S. as being treasonous and spreading fake news, The New York Times defended its credibility and the free press by showcasing the newspaper’s gritty and life-risking reporting skills through the lens of an actual reporter. 'The Truth is Worth It' picked up a Grand Prix in Film Craft and other Lions.

The New York Times defends its integrity with The Truth is Worth It.

The agency flipped the message and took a Grand Prix in Creative Data in doing so. For the 'Go Back To Africa' campaign, promoting its 54 countries as destinations, they built a database of travel imagery showing more people of colour, currently represented in less than 6% of all travel imagery, to promote travel for high-end travel group, Black & Abroad.

The words 'Go back to Africa' appear every three minutes on social media. FCB/SIX found that 70% of their target audience had been the recipient of the term while another 12% said they encountered it more than 50 times. 

FCB/SIX flipped the messaging with the Go Back to Africa campaign.

The company 'made a decision to adopt a new philosophy to put people at the center of all we do,' said Marcel Marcondes, Chief Marketing Officer, Anheuser-Busch, replacing its product-as-hero formula. Recent work paid homage to legendary baseball player Jackie Robinson, the first black player in Major League Baseball, and basketball great, Dwyane Wade.

The Festival didn’t just show how marketers added more humanity, they told. Speakers lit up the stage with the notion to put more humanity in their marketing.

Anheuser-Busch put Jackie Robinson at the center of messaging. 

Sonic branding can tell an entire brand story in less than a second.

Visa and Mastercard both leveraged sound to make that connection with consumers. To reflect the trust and security of the brand, Visa created a tone at point of purchase: They began with over 200 sounds, narrowed it to 20, and focus tested. ‘As a global brand, you need to be mindful. What’s energetic for me isn’t for others,’ says Lynne Biggar, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, Visa.

Mastercard created a comprehensive program that spans multiple musical genres across dozens of countries to localise the Mastercard melody that can be heard in physical spaces, digital places and voice. Raja Rajamannar, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, said voice is becoming a competitive advantage since consumers see 5,000 marketing images daily. 

Sonic branding was increasingly explored as a way to connect with consumers deeply on a multisensory level — especially by financial service brands, not typically associated with touchy, feely relationships with their customers. 

Slick is out – perfectly, imperfect is in.

Authenticity resonates with consumers and besides, less polished is faster, easier and cheaper. 'People have an aversion to ads that look like ads,' said Tim Leake, Senior Vice President and Innovation Officer, RPA. In the talk 'Ugly Sells' Leake encouraged marketers and advertisers to focus less on production value and art direction to be more real and relatable, an important brand criteria for Generation Z.

Leake cited work with social media platform TikTok that embraces the new standard. 'If you do this artificial polished stuff it just gets between yourself and the consumer. Nobody in the real world would talk like commercials talk like,' said Stefan Heinrich Henriquez, Global Head of Marketing, TikTok.

Unpolished creative can work as hard, if not harder, than slick ads according to Tim Leake, SVP/Chief Marketing and Innovation Officer, RPA.

Right now, what we're finding is that less polished content is outperforming the more highly produced cut-downs that we do in our regular advertising.


Toto Haba

Senior Vice President Global Digital, Benefit Cosmetics

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited