LET EVERYONE IN

03

Women run a higher risk of death in car accidents than men because car safety has been tailored to the average male. Volvo showed that women are 17% more likely to die, 47% more likely to be seriously injured and 71% moderately injured compared to men in car crashes as part of an effort that earned the automaker a Grand Prix in the Festival’s first-ever Creative Strategy category.

Volvo E.V.A. initiative released data on inequity in crash safety.

If the industry paid lip service to diversity and inclusion in the past, advertisers and marketers turned their words into actions by creating ads and products designed to meet the needs of various gender, race and ability groups. ‘Ten years ago we were only talking about the big ideas and today we’re talking about the big ideas that change the world,’ said Marcelo Lenhard, CEO, Hands, Brazil and a Lions jury member for Brand Experience. 

Positive advancements for females have yielded greater industry recognition and a more positive portrayal in marketing, but everyone who’s not a white male in adland still has a long way to go. 

THE LEAD

The world around us may be divided, but the ad industry united around the notion of creating a more inclusive world for all, recognising that it makes business sense and addresses legitimate consumer and societal needs.  

Some brands don’t want to wait and are instead rewriting the past. The Daughters of the Evolution and Goodby Silverstein & Partners created an augmented reality app that could help rewrite U.S. history textbooks, in which 89% of stories are about men. The app allows readers to scan a portrait of a man to unlock information about a forgotten woman in history.

Daughters of the Evolution used augmented reality to tackle the erasure of historical women in our reality.

Lessons in Herstory

With no sex education throughout the country, the men, they said, develop their views on women from a porn magazine, The Weekend. So, they bought it up to shut it down—but not before printing one last edition that promoted women in positive ways. Ironically, the last issue was the magazine’s best-selling issue.

Bodyform/Libresse unleashed ‘Viva La Vulva,’ a three-minute video of dancing and singing fruits, flowers, cupcakes, curtains, purses, and practically any other lip-moving symbolism that could identify as a vulva. That’s a good thing, since 68% of women revealed in a brand survey that they’re unsure what the vulva is.

Different approaches but the same result: Glass Grand Prix and Titanium for ‘The Last Issue Ever’ and Glass Gold and Titanium for ‘Viva La Vulva.’

Big, big wins went to game-changing moves by advertisers like Polish online media brand, Gazeta.PL, which challenged misogyny through ‘The Last Issue Ever.’

Gazeta.PL shut down a porn magazine, but not before promoting women’s equality in the last issue.

Some of the Festival’s most potent diversity talks unfolded at Inkwell Beach, a fringe stage organised by Adrianne Smith. She leads the Cannes Can: Diversity Collective, that's supported heavily by Procter & Gamble. The ad giant looked to pick up the race conversation with a new piece of work, ‘The Look’ following last year’s Grand Prix winning work, ‘The Talk.’ 

Addressing the dearth of diverse talent during a panel, Mike Warner, Chief Relationship Officer of New York-based agency Egami, which worked on The Talk, Sean Clayton SITO, Yusuf Chuku, VMLY&R and Ray Goulbourne, BET, said that with eight billion people in the world there is no shortage of BAME talent but there is a dearth of advocacy—individuals who go beyond mentoring and actively sponsor and support people of colour. Smith’s initiative sponsors and brings young people of colour into the agency world. That’s the way forward, said Gabrielle Union, producer, actress, and business owner.

Despite advances for women, people of colour still face challenges with racism and underrepresentation in the industry.

Procter & Gamble’s ‘The Look’ campaign

Once you get a seat at the table, do not be the happy token. You need to hold the door open wide and bring people in. When someone gets in you have to lift some of them up. That’s an example of what advertising agencies need to do.


Gabrielle Union

Producer, actress and business owner

The ultimate inclusion story addressed a marginalised population whose members often and literally may not have a voice but found one at the Festival this year.

Tommy Hilfiger, Target, IKEA, Dentsu and Nike, Microsoft and the Canadian Down Syndrome Society earned Gold Stars and a few Gold Lions for their work and talks that showcased the potential and opportunity for people with disabilities.

Dentsu hosted Paralympic champion Marlou van Rhijn, who shared her story about winning the Olympic Gold as a blade runner, and her foundation’s partnership with Nike to help make blades more accessible for youths. Helping to make the shopping experience more typical for those kids, blades and fittings are available in some Nike stores. Rhijn noted that the fight for disabled rights is a constant one, and in fact the International Paralympic Committee has to lobby prior to each Paralympic event to get new laws for accessibility.

A Tommy Hilfiger panel addressed its adaptive fashion that fits every kind of body, regardless of ability, while Target shared the story of a mom who helped develop its popular Cat & Jack line. ‘Diversity and inclusion is a conversation that many are having today but the role in our company today transcends that,’ said Caroline Wanga, Chief Diversity Officer.

Commitment to inclusion was represented across industries and sometimes in surprising ones, including fashion. 

Marlou van Rhijn shares her story as a disabled rights activist and Olympic sprinter.

Lola Mullenlowe Madrid’s ‘Hidden Flag’ for the FELGTB, Spain’s historical LGBTQIA+ advocacy organisation, created guerilla Pride visibility during the World Cup. The work protested Russia’s anti-gay policies, including the labeling of Pride materials as ‘propaganda’ that could land an individual in jail.

To build the flag six global activists recruited people to participate in a photographic protest, creating a moving, human Pride flag on the streets of Moscow that was celebrated around the world.

Gold stood at the end of the rainbow for brands that advocated for LGBTQIA+ visibility and advocacy. TBWA\Melbourne Australia won a Gold Lion for ANZ Bank with its ‘Signs of Love’ campaign aimed to create safe spaces for LGBTQIA+ Australians across the country.

The ‘Signs of Love’ campaign won a Gold Lion for ANZ Bank.

Visibility is important. If I had seen this when I was 10 it would have made a world of difference to me. It’s happening slowly. It’s happening but not fast enough.

Shiva Raichandani
a principal dancer and lead instructor of London School of Bollywood and former contestant of Britain’s Got Talent, India’s Got Talent, and France’s Got Talent

Don’t do tokenism.
Don’t be taboo.

Questions to ponder:
Is gender fluidity poised to undo equality for binary women? Will advertisers return Lions for work that would never be made today?

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

#ShowUs paired Getty Images and Dove to build a database of images that better represent all women. The project includes 5,000 images of 179 women from 39 countries that were shot by 116 women and non-binary photographers.

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited

03

LET EVERYONE IN

Women run a higher risk of death in car accidents than men because car safety has been tailored to the average male. Volvo showed that women are 17% more likely to die, 47% more likely to be seriously injured and 71% moderately injured compared to men in car crashes as part of an effort that earned the automaker a Grand Prix in the Festival’s first-ever Creative Strategy category.

Volvo E.V.A. initiative released data on inequity in crash safety.

If the industry paid lip service to diversity and inclusion in the past, advertisers and marketers turned their words into actions by creating ads and products designed to meet the needs of various gender, race and ability groups. ‘Ten years ago we were only talking about the big ideas and today we’re talking about the big ideas that change the world,’ said Marcelo Lenhard, CEO, Hands, Brazil and a Lions jury member for Brand Experience. 

Positive advancements for females have yielded greater industry recognition and a more positive portrayal in marketing, but everyone who’s not a white male in adland still has a long way to go. 

THE LEAD

The world around us may be divided, but the ad industry united around the notion of creating a more inclusive world for all, recognising that it makes business sense and addresses legitimate consumer and societal needs.  

Daughters of the Evolution used augmented reality to tackle the erasure of historical women in our reality.

Some brands don’t want to wait and are instead rewriting the past. The Daughters of the Evolution and Goodby Silverstein & Partners created an augmented reality app that could help rewrite U.S. history textbooks, in which 89% of stories are about men. The app allows readers to scan a portrait of a man to unlock information about a forgotten woman in history.

Lessons in Herstory

With no sex education throughout the country, the men, they said, develop their views on women from a porn magazine, The Weekend. So, they bought it up to shut it down—but not before printing one last edition that promoted women in positive ways. Ironically, the last issue was the magazine’s best-selling issue.

Bodyform/Libresse unleashed ‘Viva La Vulva,’ a three-minute video of dancing and singing fruits, flowers, cupcakes, curtains, purses, and practically any other lip-moving symbolism that could identify as a vulva. That’s a good thing, since 68% of women revealed in a brand survey that they’re unsure what the vulva is.

Different approaches but the same result: Glass Grand Prix and Titanium for ‘The Last Issue Ever’ and Glass Gold and Titanium for ‘Viva La Vulva.’

Big, big wins went to game-changing moves by advertisers like Polish online media brand, Gazeta.PL, which challenged misogyny through ‘The Last Issue Ever.’

Gazeta.PL shut down a porn magazine, but not before promoting women’s equality in the last issue.

Some of the Festival’s most potent diversity talks unfolded at Inkwell Beach, a fringe stage organised by Adrianne Smith. She leads the Cannes Can: Diversity Collective, that's supported heavily by Procter & Gamble. The ad giant looked to pick up the race conversation with a new piece of work, ‘The Look’ following last year’s Grand Prix winning work, ‘The Talk.’ 

Addressing the dearth of diverse talent during a panel, Mike Warner, Chief Relationship Officer of New York-based agency Egami, which worked on The Talk, Sean Clayton SITO, Yusuf Chuku, VMLY&R and Ray Goulbourne, BET, said that with eight billion people in the world there is no shortage of BAME talent but there is a dearth of advocacy—individuals who go beyond mentoring and actively sponsor and support people of colour. Smith’s initiative sponsors and brings young people of colour into the agency world. That’s the way forward, said Gabrielle Union, producer, actress, and business owner.

Despite advances for women, people of colour still face challenges with racism and underrepresentation in the industry.

Procter & Gamble’s ‘The Look’ campaign

Once you get a seat at the table, do not be the happy token. You need to hold the door open wide and bring people in. When someone gets in you have to lift some of them up. That’s an example of what advertising agencies need to do.


Gabrielle Union

Producer, actress and business owner

The ultimate inclusion story addressed a marginalised population whose members often and literally may not have a voice but found one at the Festival this year.

Tommy Hilfiger, Target, IKEA, Dentsu and Nike, Microsoft and the Canadian Down Syndrome Society earned Gold Stars and a few Gold Lions for their work and talks that showcased the potential and opportunity for people with disabilities.

Dentsu hosted Paralympic champion Marlou van Rhijn, who shared her story about winning the Olympic Gold as a blade runner, and her foundation’s partnership with Nike to help make blades more accessible for youths. Helping to make the shopping experience more typical for those kids, blades and fittings are available in some Nike stores. Rhijn noted that the fight for disabled rights is a constant one, and in fact the International Paralympic Committee has to lobby prior to each Paralympic event to get new laws for accessibility.

A Tommy Hilfiger panel addressed its adaptive fashion that fits every kind of body, regardless of ability, while Target shared the story of a mom who helped develop its popular Cat & Jack line. ‘Diversity and inclusion is a conversation that many are having today but the role in our company today transcends that,’ said Caroline Wanga, Chief Diversity Officer.

Commitment to inclusion was represented across industries and sometimes in surprising ones, including fashion. 

Marlou van Rhijn shares her story as a disabled rights activist and Olympic sprinter.

Lola Mullenlowe Madrid’s ‘Hidden Flag’ for the FELGTB, Spain’s historical LGBTQIA+ advocacy organisation, created guerilla Pride visibility during the World Cup. The work protested Russia’s anti-gay policies, including the labeling of Pride materials as ‘propaganda’ that could land an individual in jail.

To build the flag six global activists recruited people to participate in a photographic protest, creating a moving, human Pride flag on the streets of Moscow that was celebrated around the world.

Gold stood at the end of the rainbow for brands that advocated for LGBTQIA+ visibility and advocacy. TBWA\Melbourne Australia won a Gold Lion for ANZ Bank with its ‘Signs of Love’ campaign aimed to create safe spaces for LGBTQIA+ Australians across the country.

The ‘Signs of Love’ campaign won a Gold Lion for ANZ Bank.

#ShowUs paired Getty Images and Dove to build a database of images that better represent all women. The project includes 5,000 images of 179 women from 39 countries that were shot by 116 women and non-binary photographers.

Don’t do tokenism.
Don’t be taboo.

Questions to ponder:
Is gender fluidity poised to undo equality for binary women? Will advertisers return Lions for work that would never be made today?

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

Visibility is important. If I had seen this when I was 10 it would have made a world of difference to me. It’s happening slowly. It’s happening but not fast enough.

Shiva Raichandani
a principal dancer and lead instructor of London School of Bollywood and former contestant of Britain’s Got Talent, India’s Got Talent, and France’s Got Talent

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited