OPEN FOR RENOVATION

05

What’s driving the change?

Increased pressure on the C-Suite for performance

Compensation and contractual issues

Questionable RFP processes

Gender and equality issues

Discontent between brands and partners


Richard Carr
Managing Director, Rothco

Advertising needs a massive overhaul.

Some even say the industry’s model has reached a breaking point.

For an industry that prides itself on creativity and innovation, it’s surprising that it finds transformation easier for its partners than for itself.

But as holding company consolidations continue, the numbers of new independents rise, and consultancies move into the brand agency arena, what should be deduced from all of this?

The clear message is that there is no one-size-fits-all model; even if one model works for a certain time, it should be re-evaluated on a regular basis. The industry should take confidence in the fact that more businesses are moving in. The bigger the pool of talent, the greater the opportunity for brilliant and diverse ideas. A more varied collective of skill sets will help the industry to broaden the definition of creativity, and in turn, feed more impressive brand experiences. Let’s keep this industry open for renovation.

THE LEAD

The industry needs to evolve to keep pace with the rapid changes affecting it, currently making advertising more difficult to define than ever before.

For true transformation to take place, the industry needs to rely on the foundation it has been built upon:

Creativity.

The new challenges presented by the industry’s evolution require our attention and creativity.

While breakthrough work was on full display this week, creative thinking must be applied across key dimensions in this industry for a total-gut renovation, through four principles:

1. Talent renovation
2. Evolving ways of working
3. Creative technology
4. Embracing new partnership models

The renovation starts with an overhaul of our approach to talent.

The industry needs to combat professional and educational systems that still prevent underrepresented communities from thriving. They should intentionally build strategies to source and include diverse talent.

At the Festival, judges, juries and presenters lauded the high quality of creative work coming from people outside of the industry. Looking beyond the traditional agency is a good place to start to find ways to feed the talent funnel.

In the process, leaders should see diversity through a lens that takes into account identity along with life experiences and careers built in other professions. This will only make the work better and more connected.

Programs underway at Virgin Atlantic and Unilever this year saw the launch of apprenticeships designed to better equip young marketers-to-be with hands-on experience and mentorship with seasoned talent. Cross mentorship became a theme, as agencies moved to create 'menternships' to round out needs for old and young talent alike.

1. Talent renovation

To find and develop the next generation of talent, we must look for them where we haven’t before.

To reinvent the way we construct great work, we need new approaches and methodologies that are inclusive and nimble.

Recalibrating the process is nothing new, but agencies like Serviceplan and ROTHCO are inventing new methods to get to great creative. Serviceplan’s Executive Creative Director, Jason Romeyko, practices UberCreativity–a higher form of creative that brings all disciplines together. Romeyko leverages a process called the Wigwam that delivers hundreds of ideas in three days.

ROTHCO, based in Dublin, introduced ‘Polyamorous Creativity‘–a process to drive innovative work by opening up the process from a twosome to a sixsome (yes, sexual innuendos were part of the presentation). 

Mesa, based in Brazil, has crafted a philosophy that helps marketers conceive, develop and prototype extraordinary solutions in five days. Their methodology is comprised of three elements: a leader + a team with the knowledge + a mission. The process is underpinned with simple rituals, but it drives new solutions in a compressed time.


2. Evolving ways of working

Once a week we bring together all the planners and strategists that touch our business to meet up and discuss
our creative briefs and challenges.


Nina Bibby

CMO, 02/Telefonica

In order to move forward, the industry must wholeheartedly embrace creativity, technologically speaking.

Of course, there are already terrific examples of this, such as the Living Dali work, which allows viewers to interact with a posthumous deep fake version of the artist.

In creating award-winning work, Marcelo Pascoa, Head of BK Global Marketing advocates, ‘Technology is not the enemy. Tech is what makes the impossible, possible.’ Burger King cleaned up with a Titanium, two Grand Prix, along with a host of Gold and Silver Lions. 

This needs to be the rule, not the exception. Creativity and technology must be at the core of everything this industry does to deliver experiences beyond consumers’ expectations.

Brian Whipple, CEO of Accenture Interactive, summed it up best. ‘We need technology and creativity to reinvent experiences.’ This has to be our foundational philosophy, as brands aren’t just experienced through the window of advertising–rather, they are experienced across all touchpoints.

3. Creative technology

Trolls apparently make better burgers—and campaigns.

A good deal of Festival discussion revolved around Deloitte Digital, PwC, and Accenture Interactive, as evidenced by the capacity crowd that attended the discussion between David Droga and Brian Whipple this week. The two leaders talked openly about Accenture Interactive’s acquisition of Droga5 and the evolution of creativity.

While some advocated for a return to independence (#FreeDroga), David Droga explained the reason for his decision. For him, this acquisition is ‘a way to save creativity.’ Droga felt, ‘The industry has changed, and we need to stay ahead of the curve.’

Is this an integrated model that truly solves end-to-end client needs? Some CMOs are beginning to think so. ‘I’m trying to bring together these different capabilities and new ways to make our marketing effective, to make… it faster, because you need someone who understands the whole picture to help put the whole picture together,’ said Nina Bibby, Chief Marketing Officer of O2/Telefonica 

Another hotly contested topic on creativity was in-housing. The ANA recently released findings that indicate 78% of brand marketers now have some form of in-house agency operations today, a 20-percentage point increase in four years. This speaks to both dissatisfaction of services rendered and brands’ desire for cheaper, quicker, better work.

4. Embracing new partnership models

Suzanne Vranica, Wall Street Journal (left) interviews David Droga (center) and Brian Whipple (right) about the thought process behind Accenture Interactive’s purchase of Droga5.

The reality of all this is, the industry is living with churn. Ultimately, it’s evolving to a better place, but change is scary. Everyone needs to fight against the temptation to pull back and duck their heads.

This new world presents this industry with enormous opportunities. Creatives can take the lead by contributing more broadly to solve business problems. They should redefine the creative process to include their partners in strategy, technology and data. Collaboration fosters great ideas. The new model is a work in progress. Let’s figure it out together.

The new model is
a work in progress.
Let’s figure it out together.

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited

05

OPEN FOR RENOVATION


Richard Carr
Managing Director, Rothco

Advertising needs a massive overhaul.

Some even say the industry’s model has reached a breaking point.

For an industry that prides itself on creativity and innovation, it’s surprising that it finds transformation easier for its partners than for itself.

But as holding company consolidations continue, the numbers of new independents rise, and consultancies move into the brand agency arena, what should be deduced from all of this?

The clear message is that there is no one-size-fits-all model; even if one model works for a certain time, it should be re-evaluated on a regular basis. The industry should take confidence in the fact that more businesses are moving in. The bigger the pool of talent, the greater the opportunity for brilliant and diverse ideas. A more varied collective of skill sets will help the industry to broaden the definition of creativity, and in turn, feed more impressive brand experiences. Let’s keep this industry open for renovation.

THE LEAD

The industry needs to evolve to keep pace with the rapid changes affecting it, currently making advertising more difficult to define than ever before.

What’s driving the change?

Increased pressure on the C-Suite for performance

Compensation and contractual issues

Questionable RFP processes

Gender and equality issues

Discontent between brands and partners

Creativity.

For true transformation to take place, the industry needs to rely on the foundation it has been built upon:

The new challenges presented by the industry’s evolution require our attention and creativity.

While breakthrough work was on full display this week, creative thinking must be applied across key dimensions in this industry for a total-gut renovation, through four principles:

1. Talent renovation
2. Evolving ways of working
3. Creative technology
4. Embracing new partnership models

The renovation starts with an overhaul of our approach to talent.

The industry needs to combat professional and educational systems that still prevent underrepresented communities from thriving. They should intentionally build strategies to source and include diverse talent.

At the Festival, judges, juries and presenters lauded the high quality of creative work coming from people outside of the industry. Looking beyond the traditional agency is a good place to start to find ways to feed the talent funnel.

In the process, leaders should see diversity through a lens that takes into account identity along with life experiences and careers built in other professions. This will only make the work better and more connected.

Programs underway at Virgin Atlantic and Unilever this year saw the launch of apprenticeships designed to better equip young marketers-to-be with hands-on experience and mentorship with seasoned talent. Cross mentorship became a theme, as agencies moved to create 'menternships' to round out needs for old and young talent alike.

1. Talent renovation

To find and develop the next generation of talent, we must look for them where we haven’t before.

To reinvent the way we construct great work, we need new approaches and methodologies that are inclusive and nimble.

Recalibrating the process is nothing new, but agencies like Serviceplan and ROTHCO are inventing new methods to get to great creative. Serviceplan’s Executive Creative Director, Jason Romeyko, practices UberCreativity–a higher form of creative that brings all disciplines together. Romeyko leverages a process called the Wigwam that delivers hundreds of ideas in three days.

ROTHCO, based in Dublin, introduced ‘Polyamorous Creativity‘–a process to drive innovative work by opening up the process from a twosome to a sixsome (yes, sexual innuendos were part of the presentation). 

Mesa, based in Brazil, has crafted a philosophy that helps marketers conceive, develop and prototype extraordinary solutions in five days. Their methodology is comprised of three elements: a leader + a team with the knowledge + a mission. The process is underpinned with simple rituals, but it drives new solutions in a compressed time.


2. Evolving ways of working

Once a week we bring together all the planners and strategists that touch our business to meet up and discuss
our creative briefs and challenges.


Nina Bibby

CMO, 02/Telefonica

In order to move forward, the industry must wholeheartedly embrace creativity, technologically speaking.

Of course, there are already terrific examples of this, such as the Living Dali work, which allows viewers to interact with a posthumous deep fake version of the artist.

In creating award-winning work, Marcelo Pascoa, Head of BK Global Marketing advocates, ‘Technology is not the enemy. Tech is what makes the impossible, possible.’ Burger King cleaned up with a Titanium, two Grand Prix, along with a host of Gold and Silver Lions. 

This needs to be the rule, not the exception. Creativity and technology must be at the core of everything this industry does to deliver experiences beyond consumers’ expectations.

Brian Whipple, CEO of Accenture Interactive, summed it up best. ‘We need technology and creativity to reinvent experiences.’ This has to be our foundational philosophy, as brands aren’t just experienced through the window of advertising–rather, they are experienced across all touchpoints.

3. Creative technology

Trolls apparently make better burgers—and campaigns.

A good deal of Festival discussion revolved around Deloitte Digital, PwC, and Accenture Interactive, as evidenced by the capacity crowd that attended the discussion between David Droga and Brian Whipple this week. The two leaders talked openly about Accenture Interactive’s acquisition of Droga5 and the evolution of creativity.

While some advocated for a return to independence (#FreeDroga), David Droga explained the reason for his decision. For him, this acquisition is ‘a way to save creativity.’ Droga felt, ‘The industry has changed, and we need to stay ahead of the curve.’

Is this an integrated model that truly solves end-to-end client needs? Some CMOs are beginning to think so. ‘I’m trying to bring together these different capabilities and new ways to make our marketing effective, to make… it faster, because you need someone who understands the whole picture to help put the whole picture together,’ said Nina Bibby, Chief Marketing Officer of O2/Telefonica 

Another hotly contested topic on creativity was in-housing. The ANA recently released findings that indicate 78% of brand marketers now have some form of in-house agency operations today, a 20-percentage point increase in four years. This speaks to both dissatisfaction of services rendered and brands’ desire for cheaper, quicker, better work.

4. Embracing new partnership models

Suzanne Vranica, Wall Street Journal (left) interviews David Droga (center) and Brian Whipple (right) about the thought process behind Accenture Interactive’s purchase of Droga5.

The new model is
a work in progress.
Let’s figure it out together.

The reality of all this is, the industry is living with churn. Ultimately, it’s evolving to a better place, but change is scary. Everyone needs to fight against the temptation to pull back and duck their heads.

This new world presents this industry with enormous opportunities. Creatives can take the lead by contributing more broadly to solve business problems. They should redefine the creative process to include their partners in strategy, technology and data. Collaboration fosters great ideas. The new model is a work in progress. Let’s figure it out together.

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited