Stand Up or Die

01

Entertainment Music jury members made social consciousness one of its leading criteria in winner selections. The goal was to recognise work that helps achieve a higher good and inspires others to measure creativity by the same standard. The two winning Grand Prix awards tackled racism with a film for the album Bluesman by rapper Baco Exu Do Blues and a music video, This is America, by Childish Gambino.

Social awareness leads the selections

An 8-minute film helped launch the album Bluesman by Brazilian rapper, Baco Exu Do Blues.

What farmers had tried to achieve for
40 years, Carrefour achieved in eight months.

It was a week of bold moves: Polish online publication Gazeta.PL took a Titanium and Glass Lions Grand Prix for purchasing a porn magazine just to shut it down. And French supermarket chain Carrefour broke the law—and got it overturned—with organic produce grown from illegal seeds (owned by agricultural giants). They took home a Grand Prix for Creative Effectiveness because of it. 

THE LEAD

Social consciousness reached new heights at the Festival this year as lost faith in government and media pushes consumers to rely on brands to take a stand—as long as it’s not from the sidelines.

#nokidsincages

A chilling installation by Badger & Winters showed a child mannequin sleeping under a blanket in a cage. Twenty-five of them appeared around New York City near media companies such as CNN in the spring. The objective: to put the results of immigration policies right in people’s faces and make them uncomfortable enough to do something. ‘Sharing is activism,‘ said agency founder Madonna Badger in her ‘Rise Up Against Borders‘ talk. ‘Sharing is an act of protest, and this is where we can all rise up.‘

Madonna Badger tackled immigration policies with her Rise Up talk. 

Dutch chocolate brand, Tony’s Chocolonely, addressing brand activism, spoke about how its product was borne out of a mission to raise awareness for child slavery.

The mission is in the soul of all it does, down to the candy’s design and packaging. Uneven chunks remind consumers of the inequality in the industry. Coining itself a ‘slave-free brand‘—and validating the claim through court cases—the brand challenges consumers to buy candy from them vs. the massive confectioneries and effectively creates market share one bar at a time.

Tony’s Chocolonely takes on child slavery in West African cocoa plantations.

Brilliance and perseverance. And there’s a commercial case for it, as well. Brands are going to be left behind if they don’t have purpose.


Jessie Macneil-Brown

Global Head of Activism, The Body Shop

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE PEOPLE WHO WANT TO MAKE CHANGE BUT THEIR BOSSES DON’T?

The iconic sports brand moved away from mass media and into the local community. In an effort to provide a safe haven for kids in Chicago, where basketball courts had become a playground for gunfire, Nike moved beyond the quick-turn pop-up shop and partnered with the City of Chicago to renovate a dilapidated church, converting it into a basketball training facility with courts, lockers and gym. With rights to the facility for a month, Nike built local fans in a city where basketball is a religion, and then turned it back over to the city to run for the community. 

Nike Church

Nike worked with Chicago to restore and convert an old church into a basketball training facility.

 Matt Rivitz, Sleeping Giants founder

Despite death threats to his 14-year-old son, Sleeping Giants founder, Matt Rivitz, took on tech giants Google and Facebook over brand safety.

Matt has persevered in trying to eradicate conspiracy and hate sites by pushing advertisers to remove their ads from those sites and from the programmatic machines that put them there. ‘We’re a $600 billion industry. We can change hearts and minds and behaviours. We can unplug the hate machines. We’ve got the stories, the power and the money to do it.'

Sleeping Giants

Alan Jope
CEO, Unilever

'Brands without a purpose will have no long-term future with Unilever.'

Purpose works when it is a core value of your brand. Purpose and authenticity go hand-in-hand.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

'We have to broaden our definition of what makes the world better.'

Ari Weiss

Chief Creative Officer, DDB,
North America, and Jury President
after awarding Burger King Detour a Grand Prix

The product line transforms its furniture into accessible furniture for people with disabilities. Eldar Yusupov, 32, a copywriter for McCann Tel Aviv who has cerebral palsy, founded the line.

IKEA and McCann Tel Aviv took a Grand Prix for Health and Wellness for its 'ThisAbles,' a line of adaptive add-ons and attachments created using a 3D printer.

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited

01

Stand Up or Die

Entertainment Music jury members made social consciousness one of its leading criteria in winner selections. The goal was to recognise work that helps achieve a higher good and inspires others to measure creativity by the same standard. The two winning Grand Prix awards tackled racism with a film for the album Bluesman by rapper Baco Exu Do Blues and a music video, This is America, by Childish Gambino.

An 8-minute film helped launch the album Bluesman by Brazilian rapper, Baco Exu Do Blues.

What farmers had tried to achieve for
40 years, Carrefour achieved in eight months.

It was a week of bold moves: Polish online publication Gazeta.PL took a Titanium and Glass Lions Grand Prix for purchasing a porn magazine just to shut it down. And French supermarket chain Carrefour broke the law—and got it overturned—with organic produce grown from illegal seeds (owned by agricultural giants). They took home a Grand Prix for Creative Effectiveness because of it. 

THE LEAD

Social consciousness reached new heights at the Festival this year as lost faith in government and media pushes consumers to rely on brands to take a stand—as long as it’s not from the sidelines.

Social awareness leads the selections

Madonna Badger tackled immigration policies with her Rise Up talk. 

A chilling installation by Badger & Winters showed a child mannequin sleeping under a blanket in a cage. Twenty-five of them appeared around New York City near media companies such as CNN in the spring. The objective: to put the results of immigration policies right in people’s faces and make them uncomfortable enough to do something. ‘Sharing is activism,‘ said agency founder Madonna Badger in her ‘Rise Up Against Borders‘ talk. ‘Sharing is an act of protest, and this is where we can all rise up.‘

#nokidsincages

Dutch chocolate brand, Tony’s Chocolonely, addressing brand activism, spoke about how its product was borne out of a mission to raise awareness for child slavery.

The mission is in the soul of all it does, down to the candy’s design and packaging. Uneven chunks remind consumers of the inequality in the industry. Coining itself a ‘slave-free brand‘—and validating the claim through court cases—the brand challenges consumers to buy candy from them vs. the massive confectioneries and effectively creates market share one bar at a time.

Tony’s Chocolonely takes on child slavery in West African cocoa plantations.

The iconic sports brand moved away from mass media and into the local community. In an effort to provide a safe haven for kids in Chicago, where basketball courts had become a playground for gunfire, Nike moved beyond the quick-turn pop-up shop and partnered with the City of Chicago to renovate a dilapidated church, converting it into a basketball training facility with courts, lockers and gym. With rights to the facility for a month, Nike built local fans in a city where basketball is a religion, and then turned it back over to the city to run for the community. 

Nike Church

Nike worked with Chicago to restore and convert an old church into a basketball training facility.

Brilliance and perseverance. And there’s a commercial case for it, as well. Brands are going to be left behind if they don’t have purpose.


Jessie Macneil-Brown

Global Head of Activism, The Body Shop

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE PEOPLE WHO WANT TO MAKE CHANGE BUT THEIR BOSSES DON’T?

 Matt Rivitz, Sleeping Giants founder

Despite death threats to his 14-year-old son, Sleeping Giants founder, Matt Rivitz, took on tech giants Google and Facebook over brand safety.

Matt has persevered in trying to eradicate conspiracy and hate sites by pushing advertisers to remove their ads from those sites and from the programmatic machines that put them there. ‘We’re a $600 billion industry. We can change hearts and minds and behaviours. We can unplug the hate machines. We’ve got the stories, the power and the money to do it.'

Sleeping Giants

The product line transforms its furniture into accessible furniture for people with disabilities. Eldar Yusupov, 32, a copywriter for McCann Tel Aviv who has cerebral palsy, founded the line.

IKEA and McCann Tel Aviv took a Grand Prix for Health and Wellness for its 'ThisAbles,' a line of adaptive add-ons and attachments created using a 3D printer.

'We have to broaden our definition of what makes the world better.'

Ari Weiss

Chief Creative Officer, DDB,
North America, and Jury President
after awarding Burger King Detour a Grand Prix

Purpose works when it is a core value of your brand. Purpose and authenticity go hand-in-hand.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

Alan Jope
CEO, Unilever

'Brands without a purpose will have no long-term future with Unilever.'

More

©Copyright Ascential Events (Europe) Limited